Skip to content

Scott Russell Sanders Response Essay Salman Rushdie Seinfeld

Fish for Friday

The following "solitary fact," referred to in a review of George Packer's book The Unwinding, is even more striking when it comes to the disproportion of wealth in America than the often-cited one about America's anonymously wealthy "1%":

Read more »

Thor's Day's roots revisited

Brad Pitt helped inaugurate the column
Old goodie

By Morris Dean

Last July, I announced that Thursdays would be devoted to airing out religion and religions. I explained that the column's title came from the etymology of the word Thursday, literally "Thor's Day."
    It's probably useful to explain again, for readers new to this column, that in Norse mythology, Thor was a hammer-wielding god associated with thunder, lightning, storms, oak trees, strength, the protection of mankind, and also hallowing, healing, and fertility.
    Not just for newcomers, but for readers who haven't missed an issue, here's a repeat of Thor's inaugural column:

Read more »

Ask Wednesday: Do you plan to attend your 50th college class reunion?

Doubts about a class reunion in sestina

By Morris Dean

On this very day next year the Yale Class of 1964's 50th Reunion will begin in New Haven. Its members are of an age now that I wasn't surprised to see a box marked "Deceased" on the response form. When I mentioned this to my wife, she asked me how could I return the form if I was deceased? I told her she could return it, couldn't she? Otherwise, how would they know I've died?
    But when she looked at the form, the box was labeled "Divorced" and positioned under "Marital status."
    I told her if I were divorced I might as well be deceased.

Read more »

Tuesday Voice: Rememorial Day

Ortega on the left and me on the right;
we flank a soldier whose name I can't spell
By Ed Rogers

I come from a military family. We have had a member in every war this Nation has fought. Not bragging, just stating a fact that explains why as a child Memorial Day was special to us. I grew up on bases in Texas, Wyoming, New Mexico, Alaska, France, and California. We were stationed in some of those states more than once.

Read more »

Fourth Monday Susan Speaks

Dance class musings

By Susan C. Price

Oh GOD!!! (Morris’s beliefs not withstanding), it’s time to put thoughts to blank paper...again!! Not ethics...just musings on human behavior...ALWAYS a fascination…when i’m not too busy watching myself exclusively.
    And...now i am fully retired...and it’s...different. Somewhat as fun as I’d hoped. Mostly, i think about improvements to the world, the small things and the large. Since I CLEARLY know how everything should be.

Read more »

Sunday Review: The Great Gatsby

The Ungreat Gatsby: A failed attempt to transmit literature to film

By Jonathan Price

Why does anyone want to do yet another film version of one of the great American novels of the twentieth century? The answer, I suppose, is the same as why anyone tries to climb mountains: because they are there. Actually, despite the relatively small fatality rate, there is far more repeat success climbing mountains than there is any significant success turning great literature into even moderately successful or satisfying films. In fact, the effort is littered with the near-dead bodies of failed attempts at great fiction-to-film transformations.

Read more »

Fourth Saturday's Loneliest Liberal: Exactitude

By James Knudsen

ex•ac•ti•tude noun \ig-ˈzak-tə-ˌtüd, -ˌtyüd\ – the quality or an instance of being : exactness [–Merriam-Webster Dictionary]

Many years ago, as the family was travelling to Los Angeles in a Renault R16, Dad and I got into a disagreement. It was not a fight, it was a disagreement regarding geography. Now my memory places me in third of fourth grade. Our teacher had provided us with one of those, “did you know” gems and I had just related this information to the occupants of the car. I did so incorrectly.

Read more »

Fish for Friday

You may remember I mentioned a climber acquaintance who died way too young due to a fluke avalanche in a "safe" area. Here is an interesting quick read about him: "Historical Badass: Alpinist Alex Lowe," which includes the statement, "Often named in magazines and by his peers as the best climber in the world, he had shrugged off the unwanted label with typical diffidence, responding: 'The best climber is the one having the most fun.'”

Read more »

Thor's day off

By Morris Dean

Yesterday, on a whim, Thor actually listened to a few hundred of the millions of prayers that were coming in over his radio, and he informed me that the experience was so demoralizing and exhausting, he needed today off.

Read more »

Ask Wednesday: How do you look to yourself in the mirror now?

In a word: I look a bit catawampus

By Morris Dean

How do you feel about that?
    Well, I feel it's...rather interesting...to me, at any rate. Do you remember that I said in Sunday's review that to my left eye the horizon now slopes off about 10° to the right?

Yes. What of it?
     I realized later that was an incorrect statement. I think the left eye's horizon slopes off more like 6°, and the other 4° comes from the right eye's horizon's rising up to the right. That is, the right eye's horizon isn't level either, and it hasn't been since January 1996. I'm sorry I confused this point in Wednesday's review.

Read more »

Tuesday Voice: A magical part of Queensland history

Main castle side view
Paronella Park

By Vic Midyett

My wife and I recently visited Paronella Park in northern Queensland, South of Cairns. José Paronella, originally a baker from Spain, immigrated to Australia to make his fortune as a young man around the turn of the twentieth century. He first bought land and planted sugar cane—a very successful venture. Sugar cane is the main crop from central Queensland to the north. Millions of acres of it as far as the eye can see.

Read more »

Third Monday Random

Fate lies in the secret of the fork seals

By motomynd

In case you have ever wanted a new way to measure the fine line between adventure and death, here it is: If the left front fork seal of a motorcycle bursts, you live; if the right fork seal fails, you die.

Read more »

Sunday Review: Two

Baby Jessica is rescued
A magazine article, and a medical progress

By Morris Dean

Paul Bloom's thesis, in his article "The Baby in the Well," published in the May 20 edition of The New Yorker, is that "Empathy has some unfortunate features [and] we’re often at our best when we’re smart enough not to rely on it." Indeed, the article's subtitle is "The case against empathy."

Read more »

Thor's Day: A shimmering vision

Seeing through water-filled goggles

By Morris Dean

The retinal surgery I underwent last week involved a procedure (a vitrectomy) to remove the vitreous humor from my eye before the retina was reattached with lasers. Afterwards, the eye was filled with a gas to press against the operated area to promote healing. For a week I remained upright, including while sleeping at night, so that the gas (which of course rises) would continue to exert pressure on the healing area.

Read more »

Naakt: Een Autobiografie (Sylvia Kristel; originally titled Nue)

1974: De film Emmanuelle wordt een van de grootste Franse kassuccessen aller tijden. Op de filmposter een onbekend meisje van twintig jaar, met ontbloot bovenlijf en kort haar, poserend op een rieten stoel. Een nieuwe ster is geboren: Sylvia Kristel.

Emmanuelle is een fenomeen. De film draait meer dan elf jaar lang op de Champs-Elysées, in Japan en in de Verenigde Staten. Sylvia, die inmiddels een relatie heeft met Hugo Claus, gaat in Parijs wonen. Ze maakt kennis met beroemdheden als Warren Beatty, Alain Delon, Gérard Depardieu en Roger Vadim. Maar het glamourleven heeft ook zijn schaduwzijde. Drank en drugs, meerdere huwelijken die sneuvelen – meer dan eens wordt ze slachtoffer van haar eigen goedgelovigheid. Uiteindelijk gaat Sylvia terug naar Nederland, sadder but wiser. In Amsterdam bouwt ze een bestaan op als schilderes en actrice.

In Naakt vertelt Sylvia Kristel het eerlijke, aangrijpende en soms ook geestige verhaal van een bijzonder leven. Onthullend en openhartig: de autobiografie van een Nederlands filmfenomeen.

SYVLIA KRISTEL (1952) speelde in meer dan vijftig films, maar werd vooral bekend door de erotische speelfilm Emmanuelle, een van de grootse kassuccessen aller tijden. In haar autobiografie Naakt besteedt Kristel aandacht aan haar jeugd, kostschooltijd, de scheiding van haar ouders, haar relatie met Hugo Claus, haar zoon Arthur, drank- en drugsgebruik, haar leven in Parijs en de filmwereld in Los Angeles, de keelkanker die ze op latere leeftijd overwon.

Softcover – 303 pp. – Dimensions 21,5 x 13,5 cm (8,5 x 5,3 inch) – Weight 460 g (16,2 oz) – PUBLISHER De Bezige Bij, Amsterdam, The Netherlands, 2006 – ISBN 978 90 234 2553 3

Naked Hollywood: Money and Power in the Movies Today (Nicolas Kent)

To many, Hollywood is the Promised Land, a glittering frontier where a new star is born every fifteen minutes. To others it is Sin City, the land of lust and greed and the everlasting struggle to grab fame, and hold on to it, at any cost.

To those at its center, Hollywood is all these things: fame, sex, power – and money. From the lowliest screenwriter to the biggest studio bosses and highest-grossing stars, every player in the Tinseltown sweepstakes is after the same thing, and stars rise and fall like clockwork trying to make it. In Naked Hollywood, Nicolas Kent strips the layers of glamour off the town, revealing the machinations and manipulations that are the movie industry’s nervous system. Talking to more than a hundred of Hollywood’s brightest lights – from Arnold Schwarzenegger to Sydney Pollack to Oliver Stone – Kent uncovers the complex power struggle between studio heads, agents, directors, producers, stars, and writers, in which million-dollar deals are done on the bleachers at Los Angeles Lakers games, and a handful of people dominate this most prominent and American of industries.

NICOLAS KENT, who produced the BBC television series Naked Hollywood, founded the film magazine Stills at the age of twenty-two and was its editor until 1987. He is currently a partner in the Oxford Film Company, and lives in England.

Softcover – 255 pp., index – Dimensions 23 x 14,5 cm (9,1 x 5,7 inch) – Weight 348 g (12,3 oz) – PUBLISHER St. Martin’s Press, New York, New York, 1991 – ISBN 0-312-08269-X

The Name Above the Title: An Autobiography (Frank Capra; foreword by John Ford)

“Frank Capra, a warm, wonderful man, has written a warm and wonderful book, on subjects which he knows as well as any man who ever lived. His genius has been applied not only to the art but to the business of making great motion pictures, and his name on the credits has assured rich satisfactions to bankers, exhibitors, stars, feature players, extras, cameramen, crew, and the theatergoing public for more than half a century. This he has accomplished without compromising his own exacting sense of the good, the beautiful, and the appropriate; without ever losing a friend or having a scene censored.

A great man and a great American, Frank Capra is an inspiration to those who believe in the American Dream. He has called his story The Name Above the Title. If he didn’t object so strongly to the trite, he might as well have named it The Land of Opportunity. For even in early youth he was no stranger to the work, the worry, and the long hours that went with being a poor immigrant boy in a dog-eat-dog society. If all this constituted a deprived childhood, Frank was too busy and too ambitious to notice. Humble beginnings have not deterred his rise to eminence in the arts, letters, and sciences. A great center of learning is proud to honor him as a distinguished alumnus. He has served his country with distinction both in civil and military life. The famous and the notable seek his acquaintance. A series of Frank Capra hits which were to become widely imitated screen classics made Columbia Pictures a major studio. He has earned more awards than he would bother to count. Success has not dulled his wit, his wisdom, or his compassion.

Others have tried to write about Hollywood. Many have failed. Capra brings to his monumental task the sure sense of the professional, and accomplishes the only definitive record I’ve ever read on the subject. His story is so rich in anecdotes – most of them heartwarming and sympathetic – that there isn’t a dull paragraph in the entire book.

For the first time, perhaps, the outsider is given an opportunity to learn how a motion picture is actually prepared, cast, written, and shot, and what it’s really like on a motion-picture set, that democratic little monarchy where a hard-nosed director of the “one-picture, one-director” school reigns as king, congress, and court of highest appeal. Frank Capra has every reason to know that it’s a good life, quite unlike any other; but only Capra has been also able to depict the agonizing responsibility and the constant struggle between the creator of motion pictures and the concepts of Wall Street, Madison Avenue, and others who would intervene.

Capra has not only achieved a place of distinction in that select company of really fine film directors – men like William A. Wellman, Fred Zinnemann, George Stevens, George Seaton, Billy Wilder, Henry Hathaway, the late Leo McCarey, and (abroad) Jean Renoir, Federico Fellini, Vittorio De Sica, Sir Carol Reed, and David Lean. He heads the list as the greatest motion picture director in the world. If in his book he administers an occasional gentle slap on the wrist to the proud or the pompous, they can take comfort in the fact that there are picture people by the hundred who would offer their right arms up to the elbow to be mentioned in any frame of reference by a man as great as Capra in a book like his. I take pride that this American success story should have been written about the industry that both he and I love so dearly, by the only man who could have done it so accurately and so well.” – The Foreword by John Ford.

Hardcover – 513 pp., index – Dimensions 24 x 16,5 cm (9,3 x 6,5 inch) – Weight 1.175 g (41,4 oz) – PUBLISHER The Macmillan Company, New York, New York, 1971

Naming Names (Victor S. Navasky)

The moral issues that continue to haunt the Hollywood blacklist generation have never been fully explored. This book is the first serious attemt to capture the painful history of not only the blacklist’s victims, but also the men and women who “named names,” who cooperated with the “degradation ceremonies” of congressional committees investigating Hollywood during the 1950s. Some of the people were influential and well-known – Sterling Hayden, Lee J. Cobb, Elia Kazan, Budd Schulberg, Larry Parks; others, less famous, were caught equally in the vise of the times. Victor S. Navasky has unabashedly asked them – and their children, lawyers, therapists, and agents – why did they do what they did? His brilliant book about their answers is an extraordinary moral detective story.

The subject is cold-war Hollywood, but Mr. Navasky goes far beyond that small town and brings the subject right up to the present. For the issues posed during this peculiar episode in American history continue to reverberate through many central aspects of American life and culture.

What happens to a society when the state pressures its citizens to betray their fellows? Mr. Navasky’s dramatic essay in the sociology of indignation – combining oral history, interviews, and research, from gossip columns to the literature of social psychology – traces the consequences of what he calls the state’s adoption of the Informer Principle, according to which the informer became, for a brief and inglorious time, America’s cultural hero and prophet.

VICTOR S. NAVASKY, 48, a graduate the Yale Law School, is a journalist whose work has appeared in many forums, from the celebrated Monocle, which he helped to found, to The New York Times, where he worked as an editor. His previous book, Kennedy Justice (1971), was nominated for the National Book Award. Since 1978 he has been the editor of The Nation. He lives in New York City with his wife and three children.

Hardcover, dust jacket – 482 pp., index – Dimensions 24 x 16 cm (9,5 x 6,3 inch) – Weight 957 g (33,7 oz) – PUBLISHER The Viking Press, New York, New York, 1980 – ISBN 0-670-50393-2

Napoleon: Abel Gance’s Film Classic (Kevin Brownlow)

On April 7th, 1927, a remarkable film received its first showing at the Paris Opera House. In the audience, which at the end rose to its feet cheering, was Charles de Gaulle, then a young army officer, who never forgot his experience that night. What he saw was the shorter of two versions of Abel Gance’s work of genius, Napoleon, lasting over 3 ½ hours (the full version ran to nearly 7 hours), and accompanied by a 60-piece symphony orchestra and full chorus playing a specially arranged score by Honegger. The closing reels introduced the spectacular triptych technique, which predated Cinerama by 25 years.

Abel Gance had expected his Polyvision process to revolutionise the cinema, but six months later The Jazz Singer heralded the new era of talkies and Gance’s innovations, along with the epic Napoleon, were consigned to the scrap heap. Although Gance made a much shorter sound version in 1935, the original film, after unenthusiastic receptions in London and New York, simply disappeared. And Napoleon was but the first of a projected six films covering Bonaparte’s life. It cost 17 million of the 20 million francs which Gance had raised to finance all six.

The film historian and archivist Kevin Brownlow saw his first glimpse of Napoleon by chance while still a school boy. The film had been released in the late 1920s on a home-movie narrow gauge and it is doubtful whether the small London film library that sent him two reels of it in the early 1950s realised it would become a collector’s item. So captivated was Brownlow by what he saw, and so overcome by a chance meeting with Gance on one of his rare visits to London as an old man, that he decided to search for the rest of Gance’s masterpiece in the world’s archives and in private collections so as to restore it to its rightful place in film history. In all, it was to take 25 years before five hours of the original were carefully reassembled and shown, with a revised score, to rapturous audiences in performances in Britain and the United States between 1980 and 1982.

In 1966, Brownlow had published in The Parade’s Gone By… a brief account of the making of Napoleon, based largely on what Abel Gance had told him. Since then, a great deal of detailed documentation of the film’s extraordinary history has been brought to light, throwing the whole birth and death of the masterpiece into new perspective. Gance emerges as a romantic visionary with a sense of humor, tender and sympathetic towards the small concerns of his many collaborators, all of whom revered him and willingly undertook the almost superhuman effort he coaxed from them. In this new and beautifully written book, Brownlow also tells the compelling story of his worldwide quest of restoration, which continues still, a further 23 minutes of the original turning up even as the film played to packed houses in London in the summer of 1982.

KEVIN BROWNLOW’s interest in silent films dates back to the age of ten, when he began seeing them at school. He set out to be a filmmaker at the age of fourteen, but his first love has always been film history. He has written The Parade’s Gone By..., a series of interviews with the people who created the industry, and The War, the West and the Wilderness. a study of historical evidence surviving in early films. Apart from a number of short documentaries, he has written, directed and produced two feature films in collaboration with Andrew Mollo: It Happened Here (1964) and Winstanley (1975). He made the Thames Television series Hollywood and Unknown Chaplin in collaboration with David Gill.

Hardcover, dust jacket – 310 pp., index – Dimensions 23,5 x 16 cm (9,3 x 6,3 inch) – Weight 781 g (27,5 oz) – PUBLISHER Jonathan Cape, Ltd., London, 1983 – ISBN 0 224 02022 6

Naslagwerk over de Vlaamse Film (Paul Geens; foreword by Johan J. Vincent)

In dit naslagwerk hebben de auteurs alle Vlaamse speelfilms van 1920 tot 1986 chronologisch geordend en voorzien van technische bijzonderheden, een korte inhoud en enkele relevante uitspraken van diegenen die bij de film betrokken waren.

“In de loop van de korte filmgeschiedenis is België reeds dikwijls overspoeld door buitenlandse producties die ons een vreemde cultuur opdringen. Gelukkig zijn er landgenoten die daartegen gereageerd hebben. Niet op spectaculaire wijze. Maar door films te maken die iets tonen wat buitenlandse prenten nooit kunnen bieden: nl. een beeld van onze eigen aard.

Het aangehouden protest begint nu eindelijk resultaten op te leveren. In 1986 zijn in Vlaanderen de opnamen van een tiental lange speelfilms gepland. Een absoluut record! Het enthousiasme kan blijkbaar niet op. Temeer daar voor sommige films de toeschouwers in lange rijen staan aan te schuiven, andere bekroond worden met belangrijke internationale prijzen, grote buitenlandse acteurs bereid zijn om in onze producties op te treden en een aantal recente prenten resoluut op een doorbraak op de internationale markt mikken.

Dit is dan ook het geschikte moment om zich even over het verleden te bezinnen. Het verleden is toch de basis van waaruit we het heden beter begrijpen en de weg naar de toekomst voorbereiden. Uit de pogingen van onze voorgangers kan trouwens nog heel wat geleerd worden.

Maar dan moeten we hun films in de belangstelling brengen want onbekend maakt onbemind. En ‘onbekend’ is wel het woord dat het meest van toepassing is op de geschiedenis van de Vlaamse film. Wie over dit onderwerp meer wenst te vernemen, moet zich wenden tot de Franstalige literatuur waar Francis Bolen en Paul Davay pionierswerk hebben verricht. Hun geschriften behandelen de Belgische film, waardoor heel wat Vlaamse producties niet ofwel zeer stiefmoederlijk worden benaderd. Als Franstaligen kunnen ze natuurlijk niet op de hoogte zijn van alles wat reilt en zeilt in Vlaanderen. In eigen taal zijn er wel enkele thesissen over dit onderwerp geschreven maar deze worden zelden gepubliceerd en blijven dus voor een beperkte kring van ingewijden toegankelijk. Voorts zijn er natuurlijk talrijke artikels in kranten en tijdschriften. Maar zoals het past voor deze vluchtige publicaties zijn ze zeer summier en onvolledig qua inhoud.

Onderhavig naslagwerk is in het leven geroepen om dit euvel gedeeltelijk op te lossen. Daar er geen volledig betrouwbaar basiswerk bestaat, zijn we van nul begonnen. Na het opzoeken van allerlei materiaal (artikels uit kranten en tijdschriften, persinformatie, boeken, foto’s, affiches, films,…) in verscheidene archieven, hebben we de gevonden informatie in boekvorm gegoten. We hebben niet gekozen voor een geschiedenisboek (waarin verbanden tussen de films gelegd worden) maar voor een naslagwerk: een verzameling gegevens die we prijsgeven aan uw intellectuele nieuwsgierigheid, uw analyseringstalent, uw samenvattings- en interpretatievermogen.

De enige bedoeling van dit werk is een eerste poging (niet de definitieve) te zijn tot het samenstellen van de geschiedenis van de Vlaamse film. Een boek dat misschien als basis kan dienen voor andere (historische, sociologische, thematische,…) studies?” – The Foreword by Johan J. Vincent.

Hardcover – 795 pp., index – Dimensions 21 x 14,5 cm (8,3 x 5,7 inch) – Weight 1.070 g (37,7 oz) – PUBLISHER C.I.A.M. [Centrum voor Informatie over Audiovisuele Middelen], Brussel, Belgium, 1986

Natalie: A Memoir By Her Sister (Lana Wood)

The most intimate possible remembrance of her tempestuous life and tragic death.

Here is the book that only Natalie Wood’s sister could have written – a warm but unflinchingly candid account of a great star’s passionate love affairs, violent fights, stormy marriages, bitter divorces, and of her controversial death by drowning at the age of forty-three, stunning a nation that adored her.

Natalie Wood emerges as an impulsive, sometimes reckless person – never free of the limelight from the age of five – who could rise to heights of ferocity that make Medea look like Marjorie Morningstar.

The tumultuous love affair with Warren Beatty resounded with screams when he was late – or unfaithful. When Beatty popped back into her life, she refused to make Bonnie and Clyde, because she was afraid to leave her psychiatrist, this relinquishing a prime role to Faye Dunaway in a catastrophic career miscalculation. Of Natalie’s two marriages to Robert Wagner, her sister says: “They had to live out the dream the world had imagined for them whether or not it went sour.”

Natalie’s divorce from her second husband, Richard Gregson, rocked Hollywood. Lana, urging reconciliation, infuriated Natalie, who hissed, “Did that _________ talk you into coming here and saying this?”

In Warren Beatty and others, the Wood sisters – Lana a bosomy sexpot, Natalie a dark-eyed seductress – sometimes shared lovers and compared notes. Natalie wanted to know what kind of lover Ryan O’Neal was and Lana, an expert on the subject, replied, “He was like having a glass of champagne without knowing too much about the various brands of champagne. Special, that is, but not a whole lot more.” Lana would not have the same reservations during peak experiences with Alain Delon and Sean Connery, but Natalie complained of Elvis Presley: “He can sing but he can’t do much else.” Natalie’s friendships with Steve McQueen, James Dean, John Wayne, Nicky Hilton, Robert Redford, Nicky Adams, Dennis Hopper, Tommy Thompson, and Christopher Walken also figure in this star-studded narrative.

Revealed here for the first time are Natalie Wood’s near fatal suicide attempt, her weight problem that led to pills and mood swings, her drinking and anxiety over aging and bad roles, and her valiant plans for a comeback on the stage. “You know what I want?” she asked Lana near the end. “I want yesterday.”

“I cry for her often,” Lana concludes, “I expect I always will.”

LANA WOOD began her acting career as a young child, appearing in movies and TV shows. She later appeared in the Peyton Place TV series and the James Bond movie Diamonds Are Forever. She has most recently been seen on the soap opera Capitol.

Hardcover, dust jacket – 216 pp. – Dimensions 21 x 14,5 cm (8,3 x 5,7 inch) – Weight 365 g (12,9 oz) – PUBLISHER G. P. Putnam’s Sons, New York, New York, 1984

Natalie: A Memoir By Her Sister (Lana Wood)

“When Rebel Without a Cause was finished and screened, at last I could watch the car race without fearing for Natalie’s life. I sat engrossed as I relived the moment and then saw the cars go careening off the cliff, James Dean the victor in the chicken contest. It would go on to become one of the classic films of the 1950s, and it did much to secure Natalie’s place at the top of the list of the most popular stars in the world. She remained friends with Nicholas Ray, the director, and for many years she was close to her co-stars Nick Adams and Sal Mineo. She also had a brief and intense friendship with Jimmy Dean, who spent most of his time away from the filming with her. Nick, Sal, and Jimmy were often at our home, sitting out around the pool, eating, laughing, and playing games. I remember once discovering that if you turned a flashlight off and on fast enough and performed in pantomime, it gave the illusion of a silent movie. One of my friends and I put on a show, and everybody left the pool to come and watch us; Jimmy and Sal, Nick and Natalie were all kind, tolerant, and encouraging to me – enthusiastic supporters of my small attempts to shed my shyness. Natalie went especially out of her way to strengthen her little sister with intelligent and effective nurturing.

One by one Jimmy and Nick and Sal died – early and tragically – and finally Natalie joined them. I cannot look at Rebel, cannot look at any of Natalie’s films now. When I see them on television, I turn the set off. If my daughter is watching the film, I leave the room. My mother, on the other hand, lives in a world filled with Natalie, her movies, her scrapbooks, her memories. When she is not living in the present of my own life, she is living in Natalie’s past. She sees Natalie’s children; I do not. She sees Robert Wagner, Natalie’s last husband, from time to time; I do not. I have asked her many times why it is I am not allowed to see my nieces, why my former brother-in-law does not return my phone calls or answer my letters, yet my own daughter is taken by her grandmother to see her cousins (but only when I am at work and not aware the visit is about to take place). Her only answer is that I should call R.J., Wagner’s nickname, and apologize. She does not know what I am to apologize for, and neither do I.” – From chapter 1.

Softcover – 320 pp. – Dimensions 17,5 x 10,5 cm (6,9 x 4,1 inch) – Weight 181 g (6,4 oz) – PUBLISHER Dell Publishing Co., Inc., New York, New York, 1984 – ISBN 0-440-16268-8

Natalie Wood: A Life (Gavin Lambert)

She spent her life in the movies. Her childhood is still there to see in Miracle on 34th Street. Her adolescence in Rebel Without a Cause. Her coming of age? Still playing in Splendor in the Grass and West Side Story and countless other hit movies. From the moment Natalie Wood made her debut in 1946, playing Claudette Colbert and Orson Welles’s ward in Tomorrow Is Forever at the age of seven, to her shocking, untimely death in 1981, the decades of her life are marked by movies that – for their moments – summed up America’s dreams.

Now the acclaimed novelist, biographer, critic and screenwriter Gavin Lambert, whose twenty-year friendship with Natalie Wood began when she wanted to star in the movie adaptation of his novel Inside Daisy Clover, tells her extraordinary story. He writes about her parents, uncovering secrets that Natalie either didn’t know or kept hidden from those closest to her. Here is the young Natalie, from her years as a child actress at the mercy of a driven, controlling stage mother (“Make Mr. Pichel love you,” she whispered to the five-year-old Natalie before depositing her unexpectedly on the director’s lap), to her awkward adolescence when, suddenly too old for kiddie roles, she was shunted aside, just another freshman at Van Nuys High. Lambert shows us the glamorous movie star in her twenties – All the Fine Young Cannibals, Gypsy and Love With the Proper Stranger. He writes about her marriages, her divorces, her love affairs, her suicide attempt at twenty-six, the birth of her children, her friendships, her struggles as an actress and her tragic death by drowning (she was always terrified of water) at forty-three. For the first time, everyone who knew Natalie Wood speaks freely – including her husbands Robert Wagner and Richard Gregson, famously private people like Warren Beatty, intimate friends such as playwright Mart Crowley, directors Robert Mulligan and Paul Mazursky, and Leslie Caron, each of whom told the author stories about this remarkable woman who was both life-loving and filled with despair.

What we couldn’t know – have never been told before – Lambert perceptively uncovers. His book provides the richest portrait we have had of Natalie Wood.

GAVIN LAMBERT was born and educated in England. He coedited the film magazine Sequence withy Lindsay Anderson, was the editor if Sight and Sound and wrote film criticism for The Sunday Times and The Guardian. He is the author of four biographies – On Cukor, Norma Shearer, Nazimova, and Mainly About Lindsay Andreson – and seven novels, among them The Slide Area and The Goodbye People. His screenplays include The Roman Spring of Mrs. Stone, the Oscar-nominated Sons and Lovers and I Never Promised You a Rose Garden. He lives in Los Angeles.

Hardcover, dust jacket – 370 pp., index – Dimensions 21,5 x 14,5 cm (8,5 x 5,7 inch) – Weight 473 g (16,7 oz) – PUBLISHER Alfred A. Knopf, New York, New York, 2004 – ISBN 0-375-41074-0

Natasha: The Biography of Natalie Wood (Suzanne Finstad)

Natalie Wood was always a star; her mother made sure this was true. A superstitious Russian immigrant who claimed to be royalty, Maria had been told by a gypsy, long before little Natasha Zakharenko’s birth, that her second child would be famous throughout the world. When the beautiful child with the hypnotic eyes was first placed in Maria’s arms, she knew the prophecy would become true and proceeded to do everything in her power – everything – to make sure of it.

Natasha is the haunting story of a vulnerable and talented actress whom many of us felt we knew. We watched her mature on the movie screen before our eyes – in Miracle on 34th Street, Rebel Without a Cause, West Side Story, Splendor in the Grass, and on and on. She has been hailed – along with Marilyn Monroe and Elizabeth Taylor – as one of the top three female movie stars in the history of film, making her a legend in her own time and beyond. But the story of what Natalie endured, of what her life was like when the doors of the soundstages closed, has long been obscured.

Natasha is based on years of exhaustive research into Natalie’s turbulent life and mysterious drowning in the dark water that was her greatest fear. Author Suzanne Finstad, a former lawyer, conducted nearly four hundred interviews with Natalie’s family, close friends, legendary co-stars, lovers, film crews, virtually everyone connected with the investigation of her strange death. Through these firsthand accounts from many who have never publicly spoken before, Finstad has reconstructed a life of emotional abuse and exploitation, of almost unprecedented fame, great loneliness, poignancy, and loss. She sheds an unwavering light on Natalie’s complex relationships with James Dean, Elvis Presley, Frank Sinatra, Raymond Burr, Warren Beatty, and Robert Wagner and reveals the two lost loves of Natalie’s life, whom her controlling mother prevented her from marrying. Finstad tells this beauty’s heart-breaking story with sensitivity and grace, revealing a complex and conflicting mix of fragility and strength in a woman who was swept along by forces few could have resisted. Natasha is impossible to put down – it is the definitive biography of Natalie Wood that we’ve long been waiting for.

SUZANNE FINSTAD, a former lawyer, is the award-winning author of five previous literary works, including the bestseller Sleeping With the Devil. She lives in Los Angeles.

Hardcover, dust jacket – 454 pp., index – Dimensions 24 x 16 cm (9,5 x 6,3 inch) – Weight 820 g (28,9 oz) – PUBLISHER Harmony Books, New York, New York, 2001 – ISBN 0-609-60359-0

Nazimova: A Biography (Gavin Lambert)

A major rediscovery – a full-scale biography – of the electrifying Russian-born actress who brought Stanislavksy and Chekhov to American theatre, who was applauded, lionized, adored – a legend of the stage and screen for forty years, and then strangely forgotten.

Her shockingly natural approach to acting transformed the theatre of her day. She thrilled Laurette Taylor. The first time Tennessee Williams saw her he knew he wanted to be a playwright (“She was so shatteringly powerful that I couldn’t stay in my seat”). Eugene O’Neill said of her that she gave him his “first conception of a modern theatre.” She introduced the American stage and its audience to Ibsen’s New Woman, a woman hell-bent on independence. It was a role Nazimova embodied offstage as well. When she toured in a repertory of A Doll’s House, The Master Builder, and Hedda Gabler from 1907 to 1910, she earned the then unheard-of sum of five million dollars for theatre manager Lee Shubert.

Eight years later she went to Hollywood and signed a contract with Metro Pictures (before it was MGM) and became the highest-paid actress in silent pictures, ultimately writing, directing, and producing her own movies (Revelation, Stronger than Death, Billions, Salome). Four years later she formed her own film company. She was the only actress, other than Mae West, to become a movie star at forty, and was the first to cultivate the image of the “foreign” sophisticate, soon to be followed by Pola Negri, Greta Garbo, and Marlene Dietrich. She gave Rudolph Valentino one of his earliest roles, in Camille. She discovered Natacha (Winifred Shaughnessy) Rambova, who became Nazimova’s costume and set designer and later Mrs. Rudolph Valentino; she collaborated with screenwriter June Mathis.

She entertained Charlie Chaplin, the Talmadge sisters, Leopold and Dagmar Godowsky, at her Hollywood home, The Garden not of Allah but of Alla, the center of Hollywood bohemia in the 1920s.

Djuna Barnes said of her: “What happened to Alla Nazimova as a woman, as an actress, as a thinking person… is matter for biography.” Gavin Lambert was given exclusive access to her unpublished memoirs, letters, and notes. And now fifty years after her death, eighty years after her ascendancy as a giant figure to the American public, Lambert has brilliantly re-created the life and work of this complex, dark, glamorous, and important figure.

GAVIN LAMBERT is the author of seven novels, among them The Slide Area and The Goodbye People; three works of nonfiction, Norma Shearer, The Making of “Gone With the Wind,” and On Cukor; and many screenplays, including The Roman Spring of Mrs. Stone, Inside Daisy Clover, and I Never Promised You a Rose Garden. He lived in Tangier for fourteen years and now resides in Los Angeles.

Hardcover, dust jacket – 420 pp., index – Dimensions 24 x 16 cm (9,5 x 6,3 inch) – Weight 816 g (28,8 oz) – PUBLISHER Alfred A. Knopf, New York, New York, 1997 – ISBN 0-679-40721-9

Never Have Your Dog Stuffed and Other Things I’ve Learned (Alan Alda)

Autographed copyAlan Alda

Interestingly, I wasn’t afraid. It must have been Dr. Zepeda’s quiet confidence that let me simply accept as the next logical step that this man whom I’d never seen before would now take a sharp knife, cut open my belly, and permanently rearrange my insides. And I was never the kind of person who would kiss on a first date.

Dr. Zepeda explained what he was going to do: “The blood supply of some of your small intestine has been choked off, and it’s dying,” he said. “I have to go in and resect the bad part and then sew the good parts back together.”

“Oh,” I said, “You’re going to do an end-to-end anastomosis.” He was stunned. “Yes,” he said. “How do you know that?” “I did many of them on M*A*S*H.” – From Never Have Your Dog Stuffed.

He’s one of America’s most recognizable and acclaimed actors – a star on Broadway, an Oscar nominee for The Aviator, and the only person to ever win Emmys for acting, writing, and directing, during his eleven years on M*A*S*H – during which he became the only person to win Emmys for acting, writing, and directing. Now Alan Alda has written a memoir as elegant, funny, and affecting as his greatest performances.

“My mother didn’t try to stab my father until I was six,” begins Alda’s irresistible story. The son of a popular actor and a loving but mentally ill mother, he spent his early childhood backstage in the erotic and comic world of burlesque and went on, after early struggles, to achieve extraordinary success in his profession.

Yet Never Have Your Dog Stuffed is not a memoir of show business ups and downs. It is a moving and funny story of a boy growing into a man who then realizes he has only just begun to grow. It is the story of turning points in Alda’s life, events that would make him what he is – if only he could survive them.

From the moment as a boy when his dead dog is returned from the taxidermist’s shop with a hideous expression on his face, and he learns that death can’t be undone, to the decades-long effort to find compassion for the mother he lived with but never knew, to his acceptance of his father, both personally and professionally, Alda learns the hard way that change, uncertainty, and transformation are what life is made of, and true happiness is found in embracing them.

Never Have Your Dog Stuffed, filled with curiosity about nature, good humor, and honesty, is the crowning achievement of an actor, author, and director, but surprisingly, it is the story of a life more filled with turbulence and laughter than any Alda has ever played on the stage or screen.

ALAN ALDA played Hawkeye Pierce for eleven years in the television series M*A*S*H and has acted in, written, and directed many feature films. He has starred often on Broadway, and his avid interest in science has led him to his hosting PBS’s Scientific American Frontiers for eleven years. He was nominated for an Academy Award in 2005 and has been nominated for thirty-one (and has won five) Emmy Awards. He is married to the children book’s author Arlene Alda. They have three grown children and seven grandchildren.

Hardcover, dust jacket – 224 pp. – Dimensions 24 x 16 cm (9,5 x 6,3 inch) – Weight 561 g (19,8 oz) – PUBLISHER Random House, New York, New York, 2005 – ISBN 1-4000-6409-0

A New Pictorial History of the Talkies (Daniel Blum; revised and enlarged by John Kobal)

Overflowing with more than 4,250 illustrations, this classic history of the talkies is now expanded and fully updated to include all the stars and near stars, their great films and unforgettable moments.

These pages trace the talkies’ growth and development from the glittering age of the Hollywood “Dream Factory” proclaming “Garbo Talks!” to the days of Bogart and Bergman in Casablanca, to George C. Scott as Patton and Marlon Brando as The Godfather. There are the mobster flicks from Paul Muni in Scarface to the derring-do of Gene Hackman in The French Connection; the “tearjerkers” from Shirley Temple as Little Miss Marker to Ali MacGraw as the ill-fated heroine of Love Story; the special effects of 2001: A Space Odyssey and the Hellstrom Chronicle; the musicals from Showboat to Fiddler on the Roof; the horrors of Lugosi and the zany antics of Woody Allen.

Though the book begins as a tribute to the tinsel Hollywood, this enlarged edition reflects much of the contemporary scene and the controversial cavalcade of present-day films parading before us. There are Stanley Kubrick’s A Clockwork Orange and Schlesinger’s Sunday, Bloody Sunday, for example, and the growing interest in the foreign cinema from The Garden of the Finzi-Continis to Visconti’s Death in Venice. No survey to the “new scene” would be complete without the emergence of the “black films” from Shaft to Sounder. The Talkies even take us underground to explore the growth of this provocative art form.

With such a vast array of stars, moments and films spanning forty-five years of movie-making, A Pictorial History of the Talkies is not only a tantalizing adventure into nostalgia, but a fully updated excursion into the ofttimes provocative present.

Softcover – 392 pp., index – Dimensions 30,5 x 23 cm (12 x 9,1 inch) – Weight 1.260 g (44,4 oz) – PUBLISHER G. P. Putnam’s Sons, New York, New York, 1973 – SBN 399-11231-6

New York: The Movie Lover’s Guide (Richard Alleman)

Classic film and TV locations: Marilyn Monroe’s infamous Seven YearItch subway grating; the deli where Meg Ryan famously faked an orgasm in When Harry Met Sally; the diner where Courtney Cox (in Friends) and Kirsten Dunst (in Spider-Man) waitressed; Men in Black’s Manhattan headquarters; The Godfather mansion on Staten Island; the Greenwich apartment where Jack Nicholson terrorized Greg Kinnear in As Good As It Gets; Ghostbusters’ TriBeCa firehouse; Michael Douglas and Gwyneth Palthrow A Perfect Murder palazzo; the landmark West Side Story building that housed Tom Cruise in Vanilla Sky and Mia Farrow in Rosemary’s Baby; the Greenwich apartment of Friends; Will & Grace’s Upper West Side building; the All in the Family block in Queens; The Sopranos’ New Jersey mansion (and the real Bada Bing club); Seinfeld’s favorite diner; Sex and the City sexiest haunts; and many more.

Stars’ childhood homes: Lena Horne’s Bedford-Stuyvesant townhouse; Frank Sinatra’s Hoboken row house; Barbra Streisand’s Flatbush house project; Jennifer Lopez’s Bronx block; Humphrey Bogart’s Upper West Side tenement; The Marx Brothers’ Upper East Side brownstone…

Apartments and townhouses of the silver screen’s greatest legends: Joan Crawford, Marlene Dietrich, James Dean, Katharine Hepburn, Montgomery Clift, Rita Hayworth, Rock Hudson…

Plus: superstar cemeteries, major film and TV studios, historic movie palaces and Broadway theatres, star-studded restaurants and legendary hotels…

Softcover – 512 pp., index – Dimensions 20 x 12,5 cm (7,9 x 4,9 inch) – Weight 625 g (22 oz) – PUBLISHER Broadway Books, New York, New York, 2005 – ISBN 0-7679-1634-4

The New York Times at the Movies (edited by Arleen Keylin, Christine Bent; introduction by Bosley Crowther)

What did some of the most respected film critics of all time – Frank Nugent, Mordaunt Hall, Bosley Crowther, and Vincent Canby – have to say about popular films when they were first released? The New York Times at the Movies contains the original reviews of over 150 film classics. These perceptive and professional reviews of 64 years of film favorites appear together with the original movie ads and hundreds of exciting photographs.

A screen full of treats, visual and verbal! From D.W. Griffith’s Birth of aNation, the “photoplay” that thrilled audiences in 1915 to Superman in 1978 and Woody Allen’s Manhattan in 1979, the coverage in this book is – to use a stock Hollywood accolade – super colossal. “Miss Garbo is stunning in her early scenes,” reports Mordaunt Hall in his review of Grand Hotel (1932), “and the audience has seen manslaughter, gambling, a baron bent on stealing pearls, love affairs, a business deal and various other doings. And nothing ever happens!” In his overwhelmingly favorable review of Gone With the Wind (1939), Frank Nugent offers what, to us with the advantage of hindsight, is no surprise. “Understatement has its uses too,” he began, “so this morning’s report on the event of last night (the premiere of Gone With the Wind) will begin with the casual notation that it was a great show… ‘it’ has arrived at last, and we cannot get over the shock of not being disappointed; we had almost been looking forward to that.”

Bosley Crowther called them as he saw them. In 1942 he had high praise for Casablanca and for its stars, Humphrey Bogart and Ingrid Bergman. “In short, we will say that Casablanca is one of the year’s most exciting and trenchant films. It certainly won’t make Vichy happy – but that’s just another point for it.” The Big Sleep (1946) with Bogart and Bacall was not one of Crowther’s favorites. “If someone had only told us – the script writers, preferably – just what it is that happens in the Warners’ and Howard Hawks’ The Big Sleep, we might be able to give you a more explicit and favorable report on this overage melodrama… but with only the foggiest notion of who does what to whom – and we watched it with closest attention – we must be frankly disappointed about it… and, by the way, would somebody also tell us the meaning of that title…” There is no doubt, however, what Crowther’s opinion was of the great Marilyn Monroe as she filled the screen in The Seven Year Itch (1955). “From the moment she steps into the picture, in a garment that drapes her shapely form as though she had been skillfully poured into it, the famous screen star with the silver-blonde tresses and the ingenuously wide-eyed stare eminates one suggestion. And that suggestion rather dominates the film. It is – well, why define it? Miss Monroe clearly plays the title role.”

The New York Times at the Movies is a delicious mixture of nostalgia and information. There is a security of recognition, particularly since Hollywood’s timeless films and larger-than-life stars now enter into the intimacy of our homes via TV.

Who can resist recalling Katharine Hepburn and Humphrey Bogart trudging through the river mud in African Queen (1952), Albert Finney’s orgiastic repast in Tom Jones (1963), Judy Garland’s never-to-be-topped Dorothy in The Wizard of Oz (1939), Elsa Lanchester’s unusual hairdo in The Bride of Frankenstein (1935), Marie Dressler’s backward glance at a be-silvered Jean Harlow in Dinner at Eight (1933), Alfred Hitchcock’s different perspective on our feathered friends in The Birds (1963), Charlie Chaplin’s parody of a famous world leader in The Great Dictator (1940), and Al Jolson in the first of the “talkies”, The Jazz Singer (1927). Orphans of the Storm (1922), A Night at the Opera (1935), Planet of the Apes (1968), Rocky (1976) – the tremendous scope of the silver screen over these many years is recorded in this wonderful book.

Relive your silver screen favorites, and the emotions they evoked – from the lump-in-the-throat thrills of The Phantom of the Opera and Psycho, to the hilarity of Blazing Saddles and ANight at the Opera. In reviews, movie stills and advertisements, The New York Times at the Movies captures the spirit of the films we fondly remember, and, perhaps, those we’d rather forget.

Hardcover, dust jacket – 216 pp. – Dimensions 28,5 x 22 cm (11,2 x 8,7 inch) – Weight 1.020 g (36,0 oz) – PUBLISHER Arno Press, New York, New York, 1979 – ISBN 0-405-12415-5

The New York Times Encyclopedia of Film 1896-1928, Volume 1

The New York Times Encyclopedia of Film is a reprint collection of facsimile articles that appeared in The New York Times from 1896 to 1979. Due to the unavailability of actual pages of The New York Times, 35mm microfilm was used as source material. In order to enhance the appearance of the book and add appropriate illustrations, the publisher has taken the liberty of occasionally printing an article slightly out of chronological sequence.

Film reviews and obituaries are not included in any of these volumes.

Edited by Gene Brown, with Harry M. Geduld as advisory editor.

Hardcover – Dimensions 31 x 23 cm (12,2 x 9,1 inch) – Weight 1.845 g (65,1 oz) – PUBLISHER Times Books, New York, New York, 1984 – ISBN 0-8129-1046-X

The New York Times Encyclopedia of Film 1929-1936, Volume 2

The New York Times Encyclopedia of Film is a reprint collection of facsimile articles that appeared in The New York Times from 1896 to 1979. Due to the unavailability of actual pages of The New York Times, 35mm microfilm was used as source material. In order to enhance the appearance of the book and add appropriate illustrations, the publisher has taken the liberty of occasionally printing an article slightly out of chronological sequence.

Film reviews and obituaries are not included in any of these volumes.

Edited by Gene Brown, with Harry M. Geduld as advisory editor.

Hardcover – Dimensions 31 x 23 cm (12,2 x 9,1 inch) – Weight 1.820 g (64,2 oz) – PUBLISHER Times Books, New York, New York, 1984 – ISBN 0-8129-1047-8

The New York Times Encyclopedia of Film 1937-1940, Volume 3

The New York Times Encyclopedia of Film is a reprint collection of facsimile articles that appeared in The New York Times from 1896 to 1979. Due to the unavailability of actual pages of The New York Times, 35mm microfilm was used as source material. In order to enhance the appearance of the book and add appropriate illustrations, the publisher has taken the liberty of occasionally printing an article slightly out of chronological sequence.

Film reviews and obituaries are not included in any of these volumes.

Edited by Gene Brown, with Harry M. Geduld as advisory editor.

Hardcover – Dimensions 31 x 23 cm (12,2 x 9,1 inch) – Weight 1.675 g (59,1 oz) – PUBLISHER Times Books, New York, New York, 1984 – ISBN 0-8129-1048-6

The New York Times Encyclopedia of Film 1941-1946, Volume 4

The New York Times Encyclopedia of Film is a reprint collection of facsimile articles that appeared in The New York Times from 1896 to 1979. Due to the unavailability of actual pages of The New York Times, 35mm microfilm was used as source material. In order to enhance the appearance of the book and add appropriate illustrations, the publisher has taken the liberty of occasionally printing an article slightly out of chronological sequence.

Film reviews and obituaries are not included in any of these volumes.

Edited by Gene Brown, with Harry M. Geduld as advisory editor.

Hardcover – Dimensions 31 x 23 cm (12,2 x 9,1 inch) – Weight 1.685 g (59,4 oz) – PUBLISHER Times Books, New York, New York, 1984 – ISBN 0-8129-1049-4

The New York Times Encyclopedia of Film 1947-1951, Volume 5

The New York Times Encyclopedia of Film is a reprint collection of facsimile articles that appeared in The New York Times from 1896 to 1979. Due to the unavailability of actual pages of The New York Times, 35mm microfilm was used as source material. In order to enhance the appearance of the book and add appropriate illustrations, the publisher has taken the liberty of occasionally printing an article slightly out of chronological sequence.

Film reviews and obituaries are not included in any of these volumes.

Edited by Gene Brown, with Harry M. Geduld as advisory editor.

Hardcover – Dimensions 31 x 23 cm (12,2 x 9,1 inch) – Weight 1.795 g (63,3 oz) – PUBLISHER Times Books, New York, New York, 1984 – ISBN 0-8129-1050-8

The New York Times Encyclopedia of Film 1952-1957, Volume 6

The New York Times Encyclopedia of Film is a reprint collection of facsimile articles that appeared in The New York Times from 1896 to 1979. Due to the unavailability of actual pages of The New York Times, 35mm microfilm was used as source material. In order to enhance the appearance of the book and add appropriate illustrations, the publisher has taken the liberty of occasionally printing an article slightly out of chronological sequence.

Film reviews and obituaries are not included in any of these volumes.

Edited by Gene Brown, with Harry M. Geduld as advisory editor.

Hardcover – Dimensions 31 x 23 cm (12,2 x 9,1 inch) – Weight 1.720 g (60,7 oz) – PUBLISHER Times Books, New York, New York, 1984 – ISBN 0-8129-1051-6

The New York Times Encyclopedia of Film 1958-1963, Volume 7

The New York Times Encyclopedia of Film is a reprint collection of facsimile articles that appeared in The New York Times from 1896 to 1979. Due to the unavailability of actual pages of The New York Times, 35mm microfilm was used as source material. In order to enhance the appearance of the book and add appropriate illustrations, the publisher has taken the liberty of occasionally printing an article slightly out of chronological sequence.

Film reviews and obituaries are not included in any of these volumes.

Edited by Gene Brown, with Harry M. Geduld as advisory editor.

Hardcover – Dimensions 31 x 23 cm (12,2 x 9,1 inch) – Weight 1.705 g (60,1 oz) – PUBLISHER Times Books, New York, New York, 1984 – ISBN 0-8129-1052-4

The New York Times Encyclopedia of Film 1964-1968, Volume 8

The New York Times Encyclopedia of Film is a reprint collection of facsimile articles that appeared in The New York Times from 1896 to 1979. Due to the unavailability of actual pages of The New York Times, 35mm microfilm was used as source material. In order to enhance the appearance of the book and add appropriate illustrations, the publisher has taken the liberty of occasionally printing an article slightly out of chronological sequence.

Film reviews and obituaries are not included in any of these volumes.

Edited by Gene Brown, with Harry M. Geduld as advisory editor.

Hardcover – Dimensions 31 x 23 cm (12,2 x 9,1 inch) – Weight 1.855 g (65,4 oz) – PUBLISHER Times Books, New York, New York, 1984 – ISBN 0-8129-1053-2

The New York Times Encyclopedia of Film 1969-1971, Volume 9

The New York Times Encyclopedia of Film is a reprint collection of facsimile articles that appeared in The New York Times from 1896 to 1979. Due to the unavailability of actual pages of The New York Times, 35mm microfilm was used as source material. In order to enhance the appearance of the book and add appropriate illustrations, the publisher has taken the liberty of occasionally printing an article slightly out of chronological sequence.

Film reviews and obituaries are not included in any of these volumes.

Edited by Gene Brown, with Harry M. Geduld as advisory editor.

Hardcover – Dimensions 31 x 23 cm (12,2 x 9,1 inch) – Weight 1.800 g (63,5 oz) – PUBLISHER Times Books, New York, New York, 1984 – ISBN 0-8129-1054-0

The New York Times Encyclopedia of Film 1972-1974, Volume 10

The New York Times Encyclopedia of Film is a reprint collection of facsimile articles that appeared in The New York Times from 1896 to 1979. Due to the unavailability of actual pages of The New York Times, 35mm microfilm was used as source material. In order to enhance the appearance of the book and add appropriate illustrations, the publisher has taken the liberty of occasionally printing an article slightly out of chronological sequence.

Film reviews and obituaries are not included in any of these volumes.

Edited by Gene Brown, with Harry M. Geduld as advisory editor.

Hardcover – Dimensions 31 x 23 cm (12,2 x 9,1 inch) – Weight 2.145 g (75,7 oz) – PUBLISHER Times Books, New York, New York, 1984 – ISBN 0-8129-1055-9

The New York Times Encyclopedia of Film 1975-1976, Volume 11

The New York Times Encyclopedia of Film is a reprint collection of facsimile articles that appeared in The New York Times